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avocado benefits

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A perfectly ripe avocado is a wonderful thing. This smooth, buttery fruit tastes excellent no matter what form it’s in blended, smashed, blitzed, or smoothie. Avocado has gained acclaim over the last few years and with sound reason. Despite a reputation for being calorific and fatty, the avocado is abundant in monounsaturated fats which can reduce the risk of heart disease and cholesterol levels. Read more about the health benefits of avocado and explore the nutritional highlights of this beautiful thing. Check out these 16 delicious ways to add Avocados to your diet. 1. Guacamole Guacamole might be among the most popular Mexican dishes. You can make it using only avocados, herbs, and seasonings, or you can mix it with other great ingredients like corn, pineapple, broccoli, and quinoa. 2. Salads Study shows that the additional calories from fat and fiber in avocados may aid keep you fuller for longer,…

A perfectly ripe avocado is a wonderful thing. This smooth, buttery fruit tastes excellent no matter what form it’s in blended, smashed, blitzed, or smoothie. Avocado has gained acclaim over the last few years and with sound reason. Despite a reputation for being calorific and fatty, the avocado is abundant in monounsaturated fats which can reduce the risk of heart disease and cholesterol levels. Read more about the health benefits of avocado and explore the nutritional highlights of this beautiful thing. Check out these 16 delicious ways to add Avocados to your diet. 1. Guacamole Guacamole might be among the most popular Mexican dishes. You can make it using only avocados, herbs, and seasonings, or you can mix it with other great ingredients like corn, pineapple, broccoli, and quinoa. 2. Salads Study shows that the additional calories from fat and fiber in avocados may aid keep you fuller for longer,…

Avocados are unique. While most fruits are high in carbs, these are high in healthy fats. This is why flaunting avocados on one’s toast or smoothie have become a trendy affair (almost). But there’s more to avocados than what most of us know. Avocado is scientifically called Persea americana. It originated in Southern Mexico and Columbia about 7,000 years ago. As time passed, the English colonists nicknamed avocados as alligator pears (for their characteristic green scaly skin and pear shape). Today, this fruit is available in over 80 varieties (from pear-shaped to round and from green to black). Among them, Hass avocado is the most popular. According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, avocados are one of the few foods without any assigned GI (glycemic index) values. This is because they contain very little carbohydrates, and it is highly unlikely anyone would be able to eat so many avocados…